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Kaolin


Elements - June 2014

 

LATEST NEWS
Read the latest news.

Enigmatic Relationship Between Silicic Volcanic and Plutonic Rocks

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April 2016 – Volume 12, Number 2
Enigmatic Relationship Between Silicic Volcanic and Plutonic Rocks

GUEST EDITORS
• Craig C. Lundstrom and Allen F. Glazner

PRINCIPAL EDITORS
• Gordon E. Brown Jr. Stanford University
• Bernard J. Wood University of Oxford
• Friedhelm von Blanckenburg GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam

Table of contents
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GeoScienceWorld Participating Publisher

2014 impact factor = 4.463

ABOUT THIS ISSUE

The relationship between silicic volcanic and plutonic rocks has long puzzled geologists. Do granites and rhyolites share a common origin or are they derived from completely different processes? This issue explores the rich set of observations from petrology, geochronology, thermal modeling, geophysical techniques, and geochemistry used to study the silicic volcanic-plutonic relationship. Finding a consistent explanation for the silicic volcanic–plutonic relationship bears on important Earth science questions, including, “How is silicic continental crust formed?” and, “Can we predict supereruptions?”

In press: April 1, 2016

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IN PREPARATION

Volume 12, Number 3 (June)Cosmic Dust
GUEST EDITORS: Susan Taylor, Donald E. Brownlee, and George Flynn

Cosmic dust is submillimeter debris shed by comets, asteroids, moons, and planets. In the Solar System, this dust scatters sunlight (the zodiacal light), and it is detected around other stars by its infrared emission. Cosmic dust enters Earth’s atmosphere at high speeds and at a rate of 100 tons a day. These small particles are the largest source of extraterrestrial material accreting on the present-day Earth and include interplanetary dust particles and micrometeorites. Although atmospheric entry heating and terrestrial weathering have modified many, some particles are pristine primitive extraterrestrial materials that contain high abundances of isotopically anomalous presolar grains and primitive carbon compounds that have not been altered since their formation. Cosmic dust analysis provides invaluable information on initial planetary building materials.

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TOPICS IN 2016

  • Earth Sciences for Cultural Heritage (February 2016)
  • Enigmatic Relationship Between Silicic Plutonic and Volcanic Rocks (April 2016)
  • Cosmic Dust (June 2016)
  • Geologic Disposal of Radioactive Waste (August 2016)
  • Studying the Earth using LA-ICPMS (October 2016)
  • Origins of Life: Transition from Geochemistry to Bio(geo)chemistry (December 2016)

A publication of the Mineralogical Society of America, the Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland, the Geochemical Society, the Mineralogical Association of Canada,  The Clay Minerals Society, the International Association of GeoChemistry, the European Association of Geochemistry, the Société Française de Minéralogie et de Cristallographie, the Association of Applied Geochemists, the Deutsche Mineralogische Gesellschaft, the International Association of Geoanalysts, the Società Italiana di Mineralogia e Petrologia, the Polskie Towarzystwo Mineralogiczne (Mineralogical Society of Poland), the Sociedad Española de Mineralogía (Spanish Mineralogical Society), the Swiss Society of Mineralogy and Petrology,  The Meteoritical Society, and the Japan Association of Mineralogical Sciences.

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